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ScienceABC Videos is the audio-visual wing of your favorite Science website. Here, we present you some of the whackiest ideas and scientific phenomena through animated videos in our signature style. Subscribe to our YouTube channel “ScienceABC” to never miss a video.

Most of Humanity is in India and China because the ratio of human survival and occupation of the planet has always been similar, but modern advancements have allowed those numbers to increase exponentially, so the difference has become more obvious.


After the initial spread of humanity from Africa, China and India proved to be two of the most hospitable places for hunting, gathering, agriculture, and survival, mainly due to climatic conditions and available crop selection.

With more availability for agriculture and healthy life, survival rates were higher, while more space and food meant that more babies could be born.

1,000 years ago, Asia definitely had more people, but there were only about a hundred million more than people in the rest of the world.

Babies were born all over the world, and mortality rates were relatively similar; many people did not survive even to childbearing age, which "kept the world's population in check." The inability to mass-produce food also made larger populations less viable.

Moreover, it is important to remember that wars and epidemics would have had much longer and larger effects in the past. The number of people was so much smaller, life was so much shorter, and birth conditions were scarce in many parts of the world.



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Most of Humanity is in India and China because the ratio of human survival and occupation of the planet has always been similar, but modern advancements have allowed those numbers to increase exponentially, so the difference has become more obvious.


After the initial spread of humanity from Africa, China and India proved to be two of the most hospitable places for hunting, gathering, agriculture, and survival, mainly due to climatic conditions and available crop selection.

With more availability for agriculture and healthy life, survival rates were higher, while more space and food meant that more babies could be born.

1,000 years ago, Asia definitely had more people, but there were only about a hundred million more than people in the rest of the world.

Babies were born all over the world, and mortality rates were relatively similar; many people did not survive even to childbearing age, which "kept the world's population in check." The inability to mass-produce food also made larger populations less viable.

Moreover, it is important to remember that wars and epidemics would have had much longer and larger effects in the past. The number of people was so much smaller, life was so much shorter, and birth conditions were scarce in many parts of the world.



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YouTube Video VVVuSTBhRmVCeldCaWlYaUhwNTZrYXFRLlEtSk84VGxGeEI0

Why Is Most Of Humanity Concentrated In India And China?

ScienceABC II 173 views November 2, 2021 6:13 pm

Multiverse theory suggests that our universe, which consists of billions and billions of planets, stars and galaxies and extends out tens of billions of light-years, may not be the only universe that exists. There could be another universe that is completely different from ours with its own natural laws. Even more maddeningly, there may not be just one, but an infinite number of such universes, all of which differ from one another and harbor millions of celestial bodies and even intelligent life forms, just as our universe does.

Multiverse theory assumes that our universe is only a small member of an enormous composition of a multitude of universes.

The idea of multiple universes is so astounding that it has been hypothesized not only in cosmology and astronomy, but also in philosophy, music, literature, science fiction, and even religion. Because of the universality of this idea, these “other" universes are called by different names, including parallel universes, alternative universes, parallel realities, quantum realities, alternative realities, and more.
In this video, we explain what exactly is the multiverse theory and what it means for humankind.


#multiverse #science #animation


References

https://wmap.gsfc.nasa.gov/universe/bb_cosmo_infl.html
https://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/observatories/satellite/wmap/inflation.html
https://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/multiverse.pdf




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Multiverse theory suggests that our universe, which consists of billions and billions of planets, stars and galaxies and extends out tens of billions of light-years, may not be the only universe that exists. There could be another universe that is completely different from ours with its own natural laws. Even more maddeningly, there may not be just one, but an infinite number of such universes, all of which differ from one another and harbor millions of celestial bodies and even intelligent life forms, just as our universe does.

Multiverse theory assumes that our universe is only a small member of an enormous composition of a multitude of universes.

The idea of multiple universes is so astounding that it has been hypothesized not only in cosmology and astronomy, but also in philosophy, music, literature, science fiction, and even religion. Because of the universality of this idea, these “other" universes are called by different names, including parallel universes, alternative universes, parallel realities, quantum realities, alternative realities, and more.
In this video, we explain what exactly is the multiverse theory and what it means for humankind.


#multiverse #science #animation


References

https://wmap.gsfc.nasa.gov/universe/bb_cosmo_infl.html
https://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/observatories/satellite/wmap/inflation.html
https://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/multiverse.pdf




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180 28

YouTube Video VVVjTjNJdUlBUjZGbjc0RldNUWY2bEZBLlRMR2NtRGJsZVdR

Multiverse Theory Explained: Does the Multiverse Really Exist? Truth of Multiple Realities

Science ABC 4.9K views October 26, 2021 4:00 pm

Spacetime, as a concept, is related to a space that consists of 4 dimensions instead of the regular 3-dimensional space. As early as 1905, Einstein proposed a now widely popular theory that the speed of light is independent of the motion of all observers, and that space and time are interconnected in a single continuum. This theory, which is now a cornerstone of modern and quantum physics, is known as Einstein’s special theory of relativity. Einstein's proposed idea of a single continuum where space and time are interwoven is what people call “space-time”.
According to this theory, time—which has traditionally been considered an independent entity according to the principles of classical physics—is affected when a body moves through space. This happens because, according to the theory, time and space are connected and part of a single continuum—spacetime.
In this video, we discuss spacetime in absolutely simple words: what exactly is spacetime and how is it related to the force of gravitation and Einstein’s theory of relativity?

#science #animation #spacetime


References:
https://asd.gsfc.nasa.gov/blueshift/index.php/2015/11/25/100-years-of-general-relativity/
https://sci.esa.int/web/lisa-pathfinder/-/56434-spacetime-curvature
https://sites.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/teaching/HPS_0410/chapters/Special_relativity_rel_sim/index.html


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Spacetime, as a concept, is related to a space that consists of 4 dimensions instead of the regular 3-dimensional space. As early as 1905, Einstein proposed a now widely popular theory that the speed of light is independent of the motion of all observers, and that space and time are interconnected in a single continuum. This theory, which is now a cornerstone of modern and quantum physics, is known as Einstein’s special theory of relativity. Einstein's proposed idea of a single continuum where space and time are interwoven is what people call “space-time”.
According to this theory, time—which has traditionally been considered an independent entity according to the principles of classical physics—is affected when a body moves through space. This happens because, according to the theory, time and space are connected and part of a single continuum—spacetime.
In this video, we discuss spacetime in absolutely simple words: what exactly is spacetime and how is it related to the force of gravitation and Einstein’s theory of relativity?

#science #animation #spacetime


References:
https://asd.gsfc.nasa.gov/blueshift/index.php/2015/11/25/100-years-of-general-relativity/
https://sci.esa.int/web/lisa-pathfinder/-/56434-spacetime-curvature
https://sites.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/teaching/HPS_0410/chapters/Special_relativity_rel_sim/index.html


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261 36

YouTube Video VVVjTjNJdUlBUjZGbjc0RldNUWY2bEZBLjNraFlfYndmNUZZ

What Exactly is Spacetime? Explained in Ridiculously Simple Words

Science ABC 8K views October 4, 2021 4:00 pm

Atomic Models: Centuries ago, people didn’t know exactly what was inside an atom, but they had some “ideas”. Around 400 BC, a Greek philosopher named Democritus came up with a theory that everything in the world was made of tiny indestructible particles called “atomos”, which means “uncuttable”. However, this theory was largely discredited by Aristotle—the original social influencer, who believed that everything on this planet was made of four elements: earth, fire, water, and air. 
The next step in atomic theory development didn’t happen for nearly 2000 years, when British chemist John Dalton conducted some experiments. Following his breakthrough, Dalton proposed that everything in the world was made up of atoms—tiny indestructible solid spheres that were unique for every element. Atoms of different elements combine to form different compounds and are rearranged during chemical reactions. 
After that, came an English physicist named J.J Thompson and his trusty cathode ray tube. He proposed the famous “plum pudding” model. This model characterizes an atom as a particle that is composed of a positively charged mass (the pudding), as well as tiny negative charges embedded in it (like plums). After this, another chemist called Rutherford proposed his model of an atom where most of the atom’s mass was concentrated in a positively charged center (which he later named the nucleus) around which the electrons orbited like planets around the sun. After Rutherford, another chemist Neils Bohr theorized that if an electron jumped to a lower energy orbit, it would give out the extra energy in the form of radiation, thereby maintaining atomic stability. Even though Bohr’s model doesn’t hold true for complex multi-electron systems, this model is still the most popular representation of atomic structure in most textbooks.



#atomicmodels #science #animation


References

http://abyss.uoregon.edu/~js/ast123/lectures/lec04.html
https://web.ics.purdue.edu/~kdickson/democritus.html
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/ahp/FonF/Dalton.html
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18175369/#:~:text=In%201803%20Dalton%20discovered%20that,for%20his%20incipient%20atomic%20ideas.
https://pressbooks-dev.oer.hawaii.edu/chemistry/chapter/evolution-of-atomic-theory/
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/dp13at.html



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Atomic Models: Centuries ago, people didn’t know exactly what was inside an atom, but they had some “ideas”. Around 400 BC, a Greek philosopher named Democritus came up with a theory that everything in the world was made of tiny indestructible particles called “atomos”, which means “uncuttable”. However, this theory was largely discredited by Aristotle—the original social influencer, who believed that everything on this planet was made of four elements: earth, fire, water, and air.
The next step in atomic theory development didn’t happen for nearly 2000 years, when British chemist John Dalton conducted some experiments. Following his breakthrough, Dalton proposed that everything in the world was made up of atoms—tiny indestructible solid spheres that were unique for every element. Atoms of different elements combine to form different compounds and are rearranged during chemical reactions.
After that, came an English physicist named J.J Thompson and his trusty cathode ray tube. He proposed the famous “plum pudding” model. This model characterizes an atom as a particle that is composed of a positively charged mass (the pudding), as well as tiny negative charges embedded in it (like plums). After this, another chemist called Rutherford proposed his model of an atom where most of the atom’s mass was concentrated in a positively charged center (which he later named the nucleus) around which the electrons orbited like planets around the sun. After Rutherford, another chemist Neils Bohr theorized that if an electron jumped to a lower energy orbit, it would give out the extra energy in the form of radiation, thereby maintaining atomic stability. Even though Bohr’s model doesn’t hold true for complex multi-electron systems, this model is still the most popular representation of atomic structure in most textbooks.



#atomicmodels #science #animation


References

http://abyss.uoregon.edu/~js/ast123/lectures/lec04.html
https://web.ics.purdue.edu/~kdickson/democritus.html
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/bc/ahp/FonF/Dalton.html
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18175369/#:~:text=In%201803%20Dalton%20discovered%20that,for%20his%20incipient%20atomic%20ideas.
https://pressbooks-dev.oer.hawaii.edu/chemistry/chapter/evolution-of-atomic-theory/
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/dp13at.html



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YouTube Video VVVjTjNJdUlBUjZGbjc0RldNUWY2bEZBLnY0OHU4aGpxTkJV

What Are The Different Atomic Models? Dalton, Rutherford, Bohr and Heisenberg Models Explained

Science ABC views September 8, 2021 4:30 pm